Hailing from the bay area, DJ and producer, KRANE, has been making major moves in the music scene and has proven he’s one to watch in 2018. The dynamic artist talked with us about his new tour and album, about the background that led him to where he is today, and more.

photo credit KRANE

You are getting ready to embark on tour for 2018 in support of the debut of your new album FALLOUT. What can fans expect from your upcoming shows?

This is my first headline tour, and so I’m making sure each set is extra special. Playing club nights or supporting other acts, sometimes I feel pressure to tailor the music to the crowd a bit more. But, this round I want to make all the fans coming out for my music really, really happy. Loads of KRANE oldies, unreleased tracks, and some surprises. Also, I’m super lucky to have my buddies Slumberjack, MYRNE and of course Alexander Lewis along, all of whom I’ve made a lot of music with, and put on incredible shows.


We are huge fans of yours here at thatDROP, especially the bangers you put out on FALLOUT. The album features episodic trap, future bass songs and collaborations with SLUMBERJACK, QUIX, Graves, and more. What has your creative process been like, and what was it like working with other artists on this album?

There’s no one creative process. Songs can really start in any fashion and anywhere. Some of them even started as little sketches in hotel rooms, or in transit. FALLOUT was really about channeling a mood, and not overthinking the process. Working with the other producers on the album was really special. They are all people I have enormous respect for and collab well with. Each one brings an approach to songwriting and process that is really amazing, and I think it was just most important to make sure each of their styles and voices came through. Super grateful for everyone’s contributions.

Via KRANE Facebook

What were some of your greatest challenges, if any, creating Fallout? What was your end goal when creating the album, what do you want your fans to get out of it?

As opposed to singles, I really wanted the album to feel like a single journey. It was hard cutting out songs I loved, that while they were great tunes, didn’t fit with the others. Self-editing can be difficult. I want fans to feel free to take away what they want from the album. I am not overly prescriptive with what music has to mean – and I’m just excited when any listener finds things inside this collection that resonates or moves them.

Before pursuing DJ-ing and producing full time you were a product designer correct? Talk to us about how you got to where you are now.

I remember getting into SoundCloud, as a listener, hearing what was going on in the beats scene, especially in LA. On a whim I bought my production software and just started playing around after work, making (terrible) little beats. But I got hooked on the process, and over the course of a year just found myself finding every little opportunity to hop into Ableton (sometimes at rather inappropriate times). As I started posting this stuff online, I started getting some DJ bookings. This really confused me because I had no idea about the scene – the first club, the first festival I ever attended were ones I got booked for. But it was just an adventure and all for fun. Then eventually I realized I could maybe make a career out of this. After a lot of ambivalence I finally just decided to go for it, quit my job and see if I could stay afloat just producing and touring. That was two years ago just about, and its working so far, so I’m super, super happy.

You have an extremely diverse and versatile range with all of your productions. How would you describe your sound in your own words?

God, I hate trying to do that. It’s really hard to capture in words and as soon as I try and fit it into a genre I feel pigeon-holed… I’d rather listeners tell me what they hear. I draw from a lot of eclectic influences musically, I suppose one thing that unifies my songs is they tend to incorporate some sonics usually found outside of EDM.

Listen to and download for free KRANE’s remix of K.Flay’s ‘FML’:

Who are some of your musical influences overall?

Arvo Paert, James Blake, Avishai Cohen, Chick Corea, Debussy, Rustie, RL… this list will get long fast…

There’s a ton of great music out right now. What are some of your latest song obsessions?

There’s waaaay too many, and I’m going to leave too many out. But I’m always featuring lots of up-and-comers I discover on my Spotify Playlist “KRANE SELECTS” people can always hear what I’m jamming there.

What would you say to someone who wants to pursue music but is worried about not making it?

Well, you might not make it, but it should be about fun and enjoyment and passion. Because while I’m getting by right now, maybe I won’t make it in another year? You never know- so it should be all about the journey. You gotta love struggling, sucking, hating your own music, playing crummy shows… really you need to just find what makes you happy. So, if you don’t “make it” however you define that, it’s ok because you look back and see how much fun you had.

What’s something that most people don’t know about you?

I’m obsessed with cooking and baking. 90% of shows I watch are about food, and I’m constantly on food blogs planning the next thing I want to cook.

What are your goals for 2018? Any New Years resolutions?

2018 goals: keep having fun, take myself less seriously.

Any final comments to your fans?

Just from the bottom of my heart: THANK YOU. Seriously. I’m still awe-struck I have fans, and these people are helping me make a career in music. It’s really something amazing and I’m uber grateful.

Listen to and download for free KRANE’s older single ‘Dollar Sines’:

Follow KRANE: Facebook | SoundCloud | Website | Spotify